chiropractic treatment mononucleosis - Mono and Your Teenager

2014-08-28

chiropractic treatment mononucleosis
Mono and Your Teenager

The viruses are usually transmitted to other people through saliva (the reason why it is also called kissing disease), blood, sharing drinks and sharing utensils. The symptoms usually lasts for 4-6 weeks and do not cross 4 months. The disease is diagnosable but requires a though medical history of the adolescent. The diagnosis also involves physical examination of the adolescent and is based on symptoms reported to the physician. The diagnosis is further supported by laboratory test like blood test, antibody test and test to count white blood cells.You must have searched high and low for some matter for Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally, isn't it? That is the main reason we compiled this article for you to get that required matter!

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Mono and Your Teenager

Mononucleosis can affects any person. As said earlier, many people would have been infected by the time their body reaches adulthood. As the body fights back the viruses, there are no symptoms seen. The disease of mononucleosis is seen in teenagers who are from the age group of 15 to 17 years old. When children are affected by the symptoms, they are less severe. However, they are seen with small symptoms of normal fever and throat infections.It is not always that we just turn on the computer, and there is a page about Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally. We have written this article to let others know more about Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally through our resources.

Because mono is a viral infection, antibiotics are ineffectual. They will only be prescribed by a doctor if you develop a secondary bacterial infection like strep throat. Don't play sport or lift heavy objects. Impact, over-exertion, and strain can rupture a swollen spleen. You will also get exhausted which will make it harder for your immune system to fight off the virus.

A real danger of CFS is the ease at which it "can be misdiagnosed or overlooked because its symptoms are common to many other disorders." (3) Mononucleosis can also be easily missed, as symptoms include "fever, sore throat, and fatigue," which can be mistaken for the common cold or flu. (2) Early recognition and treatment of mononucleosis and CFS are important. According to the CDC, there is "evidence to indicate that the sooner a person is treated, the better the chance of improvement." (3)Now while reading about Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally, don't you feel that you never knew so much existed about Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally? So much matter you never knew existed.

The kissing disease can also cause enlarged tonsils, or a sore throat. Since the kissing disease, mono is caused by a virus there are no specific treatments. Antibiotics don't work to fight the kissing disease so the treatments are mainly supportive. Medicines such as steroids or antiviral also have little to no effect on the mono. Writing about Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally is an interesting writing assignment. There is no end to it, as there is so much to write about it!

A repot in the New England Journal of Medicine quotes Dr. Stephen Straus of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases says that chronic fatigue could characterize an abnormal response to infection. Scientists think a number of patients by no means completely recover from the flu, but as a substitute develop long-standing signs of chronic fatigue.Keep your mind open to anything when reading about Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally. Opinions may differ, but it is the base of Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally that is important.

Mononucleosis is diagnosed through a blood test called a spot test. This test reveals the presence of specific viral antibodies and also confirms the presence of mono. Additionally, a liver function test can assist in the diagnosis.Accept the way things are in life. Only then will you be able to accept these points on Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally. Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally can be considered to be part and parcel of life.

The herpes zoster virus is the cause of shingles, which occurs when the immune system is weakened and the dormant virus is activated. Symptoms include acute skin sensitivity and a classic rash running around one half of the midriff. The face, neck, and (rarely) eyes may also be affected.Ignorance is bliss they say. However, do you find this practical when you read so much about Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally?

Homeopathic Medicine focuses on the body???s ability to heal itself. These homeopathic treatments have been effective with each individual mononucleosis symptom. The use of the herb Belladonna has been noted as being effective against sore throat and fever. Phytolacca is commonly used to treat the mononucleosis symptom of swelling as well as pain. Each individual responds differently to homeopathic treatments, therefore it is imperative to contact a homeopathic profession prior to treatment.Make the best use of life by learning and reading as much as possible. read about things unknown, and more about things known, like about Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally.

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  • Get Well Faster!
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Mono and Your Teenager

Some folks, sadly, are just flat out nasty at it. And it's gloomy as it really doesn't need to be that way. Kissing isn't just in the method but in the approach as well . How you go about giving the kiss is just about as vital as the kiss itself.Life is short. Use it to its maximum by utilizing whatever knowledge it offers for knowledge is important for all walks of life. Even the crooks have to be intelligent!

The symptoms of Mono kissing disease vary from person to person, but they all come close to what is typically seen in individuals who have this disease. One of the symptoms is feeling like you have the flu. Another common symptom for people who are younger is a sore throat. The glands that are in the throat area have become swollen. Rapid weight loss is another sign that you might have been exposed to the disease. Not having an appetite is another sign that should also be taken seriously.Whenever one reads any reading matter, it is vital that the person enjoys reading it. One should grasp the meaning of the matter, only then can it be considered that the reading is complete.

Like all infections, this condition causes fever, chill, body aches and a sore throat (pharyngitis) - the most prominent symptom - and may persist for weeks or months. It also causes swollen lymph glands because the virus enters the lymphocytes and multiplies there.Thinking of life without Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally seem to be impossible to imagine. This is because Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally can be applied in all situations of life.

So while you have contracted a disease that has to run its course you now have a mono remedy to try to see what works for you. Some remedies just do not work for some people so you may have to go through some trial and error before you find your answer.Just as a book shouldn't be judged by its cover, we wish you read this entire article on Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally before actually making a judgement about Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally.

Antibiotics are ineffective because mono is a virus. A doctor may prescribe them if a secondary bacterial infection occurs, e. G. Strep throat or an ear infection. Often, mono is mistaken for flu because it has very similar symptoms. Avoid lifting heavy objects and playing sport. Over-exertion, straining, and impact can cause a swollen spleen to burst. Also, the body will become exhausted and the immune system will struggle to fight the infection if it has no energy.You actually learn more about Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally only with more reading on matters pertaining to it. So the more articles you read like this, the more you learn about Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally.

Mononucleosis is a virus that is passed through the saliva and close contact. Hence the name "the kissing disease". It is most often seem in teens between the age of 15-17, but can be transmitted to anyone of any age. While kissing is certainly a way that mononucleosis can be spread, there are other ways that it can be transmitted such as sharing a straw or cup, or even by being in close proximity when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Mononucleosis has a long incubation period which means that it may take between 30-50 days after exposure for you to feel any symptoms. We have tried to place the best definition about Mononucleosis - How to treat Mono naturally in this article. This has taken a lot of time, but we only wish that the definition we gave suits your needs.
Chad R. Copeland


Our Readers' Comments:

    has anyone had mononucleosis?

  • Cailin asked on Thu, 03 Jan, 2008
    i think i have it, but i want to know how bad peoples experiances were. im really scared, and im a 14 year old female.
  • Gecko Juice replied on Thu, 03 Jan, 2008
    Introduction Infectious mononucleosis (mono), or glandular fever, is often called the kissing disease. The label is only partly true. The virus that causes this disease is transmitted through saliva, so kissing can spread the virus, but so can coughing, sneezing, or sharing a glass or food utensil. Mononucleosis isn't as contagious as some other infections, such as the common cold. The cause of mononucleosis is the Epstein-Barr virus, although similar signs and symptoms are sometimes caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV). Full-blown mononucleosis is most common in adolescents and young adults. Young children usually have minimal symptoms, and the infection often goes unrecognized. In lesser developed countries, mononucleosis is more frequently acquired at a young age, so classic signs and symptoms of mononucleosis aren't as common as they are in developed nations. Mononucleosis usually isn't very serious, although the virus remains in your body for life. Most people have been exposed to the Epstein-Barr virus by the time they're 35 years old and have built up antibodies. They're immune and won't get mononucleosis again. Treatment mostly involves bed rest and getting adequate fluids. Signs and symptoms Signs and symptoms of mononucleosis may include: Fatigue Weakness Sore throat, perhaps a strep throat that doesn't get better with antibiotics Fever Swollen lymph nodes in your neck and armpits Swollen tonsils Headache Skin rash Loss of appetite Soft, swollen spleen Night sweats In children between the ages of 4 and 15, the virus may cause a mild illness that resembles a common respiratory infection. In older adults, mononucleosis causes more severe signs and symptoms and lasts longer. The virus typically has an incubation period of four to six weeks, although in young children this period is shorter. Signs and symptoms such as fever and sore throat usually lessen within a couple of weeks, although fatigue, enlarged lymph nodes and a swollen spleen may last for a few weeks When to seek medical advice If you've been feeling tired and weak; have had a persistent fever, headache, loss of appetite, rash and muscle aches; and have had swollen lymph nodes and tonsils — these are strong indications that you have mononucleosis. If rest and a healthy diet don't ease your symptoms within a week or two or if your symptoms recur, see your doctor. Screening and diagnosis Your doctor may suspect mononucleosis based on your signs and symptoms and a physical examination. If there's a need for additional confirmation, a Monospot test may be done to check your blood for antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus. This screening test gives results within a day. But it may not detect the infection during the first week of the illness. A different antibody blood test requires a longer result time, but can detect the disease even within the first week of symptoms. Your doctor may use other blood tests to look for an elevated number of white blood cells (lymphocytes) or abnormal-looking lymphocytes. These blood tests won't confirm mononucleosis, but they may suggest it as a possibility. Complications Enlarged spleen Among significant complications of mononucleosis is enlargement of the spleen. In extreme cases, your spleen may rupture, causing sharp, sudden pain in the left side of your upper abdomen. If such pain occurs, seek medical attention immediately — you may need surgery. Most people with mononucleosis have mild liver inflammation (hepatitis). A yellowing of your skin and the whites of your eyes (jaundice) occurs occasionally, usually in people older than 35. About half the people with mononucleosis have a low count of platelets, which are blood cells involved in clotting. Less common complications Mononucleosis can also result in the following less common complications: Anemia, a decrease in red blood cells and in hemoglobin, an iron-rich protein in red blood cells Inflammation of the heart Complications involving the nervous system (meningitis, encephalitis, seizures, Bell's palsy, Guillain-Barre syndrome) Swollen tonsils, leading to obstructed breathing The Epstein-Barr virus can cause much more serious illness in people who have impaired immune systems, such as people with HIV/AIDS or people taking drugs to suppress immunity after an organ transplant. Treatment There's no specific therapy available to treat infectious mononucleosis. Antibiotics don't work against viral infections such as mono. Treatment mainly involves bed rest and adequate fluid intake. Occasionally, a streptococcal (strep) infection accompanies the sore throat of mononucleosis. You may also develop a sinus infection or an infection of your tonsils (tonsillitis). If so, you may need treatment with antibiotics for these accompanying bacterial infections. Some people with mononucleosis who take ampicillin (Principen), amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox), or amoxicillin and clavulanate (Augmentin) antibiotics may develop a rash, but this doesn't mean that they're allergic to the antibiotic. If needed, other antibiotics that are less likely to cause a rash are available to treat infections that may accompany mononucleosis. To ease some of your symptoms, such as swelling of your throat and tonsils, your doctor may prescribe a corticosteroid medication such as prednisone. Prevention Mononucleosis is believed to spread through saliva. If you're infected, you can help prevent spreading the virus to others by not kissing them and by not sharing food, dishes, glasses and utensils until several days after your fever has subsided and even longer, if possible. The Epstein-Barr virus may persist in your saliva for months after the infection. If you've had mononucleosis, don't donate blood for at least six months after the onset of the illness. There's no vaccine to prevent mononucleosis. Self-care In addition to getting plenty of bed rest, these steps can help relieve symptoms: Drink plenty of water and fruit juices. Fluids help relieve fever and sore throat and prevent dehydration. Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. Use pain relievers such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) as needed. These medicines have no antiviral properties; the only reasons to take them are to relieve pain or a fever. Don't give aspirin to a child under age 16. Aspirin may trigger a rare but potentially fatal disorder known as Reye's syndrome. Gargle with salt water. Do this several times a day to relieve sore throat. Mix 1/2 teaspoon salt in a glass of warm water. Most signs and symptoms of mononucleosis ease within a few weeks, but it may be two to three months before you feel completely normal. The more rest you get initially, the sooner you should recover. Returning to your usual schedule too soon can increase the risk of a relapse. If you're an athlete, be cautious about returning to strenuous activities or contact sports, especially if your spleen is enlarged, because of the increased risk of rupturing the spleen. Children with mononucleosis and an enlarged spleen shouldn't engage in vigorous activities, roughhousing or contact sports for the same reason. Rupture of the spleen results in severe bleeding and is a medical emergency. Doctors recommend avoiding contact sports for at least one to two months after you've had mononucleosis, depending on how long it takes your spleen to return to normal size. Although you may not be able to return to vigorous activities right away, your doctor may recommend gradual exercise to help you rebuild your strength as you recover from mononucleosis. Coping skills Mononucleosis can be a prolonged condition, keeping you at home for weeks as you recover. But be patient with your body as it fights the infection. For the first week, you may be so fatigued that you feel too weak to even get out of bed. But the tiredness lessens with time. Throat soreness is generally the worst for the first five to seven days of illness. Your swollen lymph glands (nodes) should return to normal size by the fourth week of infection. For young people, having mononucleosis will mean some missed activities — classes, team practices and parties. Without doubt, you'll need to take it easy for a while. If you have mononucleosis, you don't necessarily need to be quarantined. Many people are already immune to the Epstein-Barr virus that causes the disease because of prior exposure to the virus as a child. But plan on staying home from class and other activities until you're feeling better. Seek the help of friends and family as you recover from mononucleosis. College students should also contact the campus student health center staff for assistance or treatment, if necessary.
  • jazzygirl110381 replied on Thu, 03 Jan, 2008
    I had it when I was 13 and is rough, but you'll get through it. I was just extremely tired all of the time and your immune system is down so it easier for you to catch a cold. If you rest and drink PLENTY of fluids you will get over it easier.
  • kwflamingo replied on Thu, 03 Jan, 2008
    I had it at about the same age you are now - mine began as strep throat. I really felt pretty good - except tired all the time - had to go to the doc's office 2x a week for blood tests - had to increase my potassium intake - pumpkin, squash, yuck!! - but I did get excused from PE for a year - which was definitely a bonus tome - was out of school for about 2 months - was a bummer, but did do some work to stay up to date. You'll be fine - hang in there - get lots of rest!






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Read more about chiropractic treatment mononucleosis...

Mononucleosis is a viral infection causing fever, sore throat, and swollen lymph glands, especially in the neck. Typically it is experienced by those in their mid to late teenage years, but others can get it also. It is usually linked to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Its effects can last up to several months although the major symptoms usually subside after a few weeks. There are things you can...

Mononucleosis is an infectious viral disease that is most often caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. More rarely, it can be caused by cytomegalovirus. Both of these viruses are members of the herpes family. Once the virus enters the body, it multiplies in lymphocytes. Mono then affects the respiratory system, the lymphatic tissues, and glands in the neck, groin, armpits, bronchial tubes, spleen, and...

The real name for the mono kissing disease is Mononucleosis. It is a viral disease that is spread from one person to another person through kissing. Hence the nick name that it was given, mono kissing disease. It is a type of the herpes virus that is caused by the Epstein - Barr virus, better known as EBV. Majority of the people who are in their adolescents and adulthood have been exposed to the...

Question: My niece has glandular fever. She can't get out of bed for more than a couple of hours, and her throat is so swollen that she cannot swallow solids. She is in her last year at Cambridge University where she is predicted to get a first. What do you suggest? Answer: Glandular fever is the common name of a viral infection caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. It used to be called...

Infectious mononucleosis in teenagers increases the risk of chronic fatigue syndrome. Researchers in Chicago have found that teenagers, girls specifically, tend to have an increased risk of developing chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The authors of the study explained that "six, 12, and 24 months after infectious mononucleosis, 13%, 7%, and 4% of adolescents, respectively, met the criteria for...

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User Ratings 4.6 / 5

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